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theyuniversity:

Last week, College Essay Guy explained how NOT to write the “Why us?” statement. This week, he will show us some concrete examples of statements that do—and don’t—work.

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The best way to sound excited in your “Why us?” statement is to actually get excited about the school you’re…

broadcastarchive-umd
broadcastarchive-umd:

Clayton Moore (1914–1999) was an American actor best known for playing the fictional western character the Lone Ranger from 1949–1951 and 1954–1957 on the television series of the same name.
As creator-producer of The Lone Ranger radio show (with writer Fran Striker), George Trendle was about to launch the television version. He spotted Moore in the Ghost of Zorro movie serial.and he landed the role.
Moore trained his voice to sound like the radio version of The Lone Ranger, which had then been on the air since 1933, and succeeded in lowering his already distinctive baritone even further. With the first notes of Rossini’s “William Tell Overture” and actor Gerald Mohr's “Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear… “
Moore and co-star Jay Silverheels, in the role of Tonto, made television history as the stars of the first Western written specifically for that medium. The Lone Ranger soon became the highest-rated program to that point on the fledgling ABC network and its first true hit, earning an Emmy nomination in 1950. Moore starred in 169 episodes of the television show. (Wikipedia)

broadcastarchive-umd:

Clayton Moore (1914–1999) was an American actor best known for playing the fictional western character the Lone Ranger from 1949–1951 and 1954–1957 on the television series of the same name.

As creator-producer of The Lone Ranger radio show (with writer Fran Striker), George Trendle was about to launch the television version. He spotted Moore in the Ghost of Zorro movie serial.and he landed the role.

Moore trained his voice to sound like the radio version of The Lone Ranger, which had then been on the air since 1933, and succeeded in lowering his already distinctive baritone even further. With the first notes of Rossini’s “William Tell Overture” and actor Gerald Mohr's “Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear… “

Moore and co-star Jay Silverheels, in the role of Tonto, made television history as the stars of the first Western written specifically for that medium. The Lone Ranger soon became the highest-rated program to that point on the fledgling ABC network and its first true hit, earning an Emmy nomination in 1950. Moore starred in 169 episodes of the television show. (Wikipedia)